Still, 2005 - ongoingphotographic series, direct canned flora, archival prints, edition of ten

When viewers first enter this exhibition they are faced with two sets of distinct imagery. The first is made up of five large giclée prints depicting magnifications of flowers and bugs. These beautiful images are immediately impressive because of their sheer size and beauty and they draw the viewer in out of a desire to be closer...

...The five large giclée prints are similar in that their final result and the reality behind them are not the same. Taken from scanned images of flowers, these portions are then honed in on by Heller on her computer screen and then magnified and printed out. The results are the beautiful colours and textures of the flowers and petals combined with any dust on the scanner surface, flaws in the scanning process and other unexpected objects like dead bugs. The texture of the petals end up feeling fabric-like or maybe even like skin and the details of the fly and bee are incredible. If the viewers allow themselves to live with the images for a while they will enter into a whole new world. One viewer upon seeing one of the Still prints said:

Who would have known that...the edge of a dying flower could turn into a wave of an orange ocean, cradling a dead fly that reminds us of a sleeping baby. (Suzanne Smith)
Curator's Essay

 

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Still, 2005 - ongoingphotographic series, direct canned flora, archival prints, edition of ten

When viewers first enter this exhibition they are faced with two sets of distinct imagery. The first is made up of five large giclée prints depicting magnifications of flowers and bugs. These beautiful images are immediately impressive because of their sheer size and beauty and they draw the viewer in out of a desire to be closer...

...The five large giclée prints are similar in that their final result and the reality behind them are not the same. Taken from scanned images of flowers, these portions are then honed in on by Heller on her computer screen and then magnified and printed out. The results are the beautiful colours and textures of the flowers and petals combined with any dust on the scanner surface, flaws in the scanning process and other unexpected objects like dead bugs. The texture of the petals end up feeling fabric-like or maybe even like skin and the details of the fly and bee are incredible. If the viewers allow themselves to live with the images for a while they will enter into a whole new world. One viewer upon seeing one of the Still prints said:

Who would have known that...the edge of a dying flower could turn into a wave of an orange ocean, cradling a dead fly that reminds us of a sleeping baby. (Suzanne Smith)
Curator's Essay